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#[repr(transparent)]
pub struct FileName(_);
Expand description

A file name in a TempFile or multipart DataField.

A Content-Disposition header, either in a response or a multipart field, can optionally specify a filename directive as identifying information for the attached file. This type represents the value of that directive.

Safety

There are no restrictions on the value of the directive. In particular, the value can be wholly unsafe to use as a file name in common contexts. As such, Rocket sanitizes the value into a version that is safe to use as a file name in common contexts; this sanitized version can be retrieved via FileName::as_str() and is returned by TempFile::name().

You will likely want to prepend or append random or user-specific components to the name to avoid collisions; UUIDs make for a good “random” data. You may also prefer to avoid the value in the directive entirely by using a safe, application-generated name instead.

Implementations

Wraps a string as a FileName. This is cost-free.

Example
use rocket::fs::FileName;

let name = FileName::new("some-file.txt");
assert_eq!(name.as_str(), Some("some-file"));

let name = FileName::new("some-file.txt");
assert_eq!(name.dangerous_unsafe_unsanitized_raw(), "some-file.txt");

The sanitized file name, stripped of any file extension and special characters, safe for use as a file name.

Sanitization

A “sanitized” file name is a non-empty string, stripped of its file extension, which is not a platform-specific reserved name and does not contain any platform-specific special characters.

On Unix, these are the characters '.', '/', '\\', '<', '>', '|', ':', '(', ')', '&', ';', '#', '?', '*'.

On Windows (and non-Unix OSs), these are the characters '.', '<', '>', ':', '"', '/', '', '|', '?', '*', ',', ';', '=', '(', ')', '&', '#', and the reserved names "CON", "PRN", "AUX", "NUL", "COM1", "COM2", "COM3", "COM4", "COM5", "COM6", "COM7", "COM8", "COM9", "LPT1", "LPT2", "LPT3", "LPT4", "LPT5", "LPT6", "LPT7", "LPT8", "LPT9".

Additionally, all control characters are considered “special”.

An attempt is made to transform the raw file name into a sanitized version by identifying a valid substring of the raw file name that meets this criteria. If none is found, None is returned.

Example
use rocket::fs::FileName;

let name = FileName::new("some-file.txt");
assert_eq!(name.as_str(), Some("some-file"));

let name = FileName::new("some-file.txt.zip");
assert_eq!(name.as_str(), Some("some-file"));

let name = FileName::new("../../../../etc/shadow");
assert_eq!(name.as_str(), Some("shadow"));

let name = FileName::new("/etc/.shadow");
assert_eq!(name.as_str(), Some("shadow"));

let name = FileName::new("/a/b/some/file.txt.zip");
assert_eq!(name.as_str(), Some("file"));

let name = FileName::new("/a/b/some/.file.txt.zip");
assert_eq!(name.as_str(), Some("file"));

let name = FileName::new("/a/b/some/.*file.txt.zip");
assert_eq!(name.as_str(), Some("file"));

let name = FileName::new("a/\\b/some/.*file<.txt.zip");
assert_eq!(name.as_str(), Some("file"));

let name = FileName::new(">>>.foo.txt");
assert_eq!(name.as_str(), Some("foo"));

let name = FileName::new("b:c");
#[cfg(unix)] assert_eq!(name.as_str(), Some("b"));
#[cfg(not(unix))] assert_eq!(name.as_str(), Some("c"));

let name = FileName::new("//./.<>");
assert_eq!(name.as_str(), None);

Returns true if the complete raw file name is safe.

Note that .as_str() returns a safe subset of the raw file name, if there is one. If this method returns true, then that subset is the complete raw file name.

This method should be use sparingly. In particular, there is no advantage to calling is_safe() prior to calling as_str(); simply call as_str().

Example
use rocket::fs::FileName;

let name = FileName::new("some-file.txt");
assert_eq!(name.as_str(), Some("some-file"));
assert!(!name.is_safe());

let name = FileName::new("some-file");
assert_eq!(name.as_str(), Some("some-file"));
assert!(name.is_safe());

The raw, unsanitized, potentially unsafe file name. Prefer to use FileName::as_str(), always.

⚠️ DANGER ⚠️

This method returns the file name exactly as it was specified by the client. You should not use this name unless you require the originally specified filename and it is known not to contain special, potentially dangerous characters, and:

  1. All clients are known to be trusted, perhaps because the server only runs locally, serving known, local requests, or…

  2. You will not use the file name to store a file on disk or any context that expects a file name and you will not use the extension to determine how to handle/parse the data, or…

  3. You will expertly process the raw name into a sanitized version for use in specific contexts.

If not all of these cases apply, use FileName::as_str().

Example
use rocket::fs::FileName;

let name = FileName::new("some-file.txt");
assert_eq!(name.dangerous_unsafe_unsanitized_raw(), "some-file.txt");

let name = FileName::new("../../../../etc/shadow");
assert_eq!(name.dangerous_unsafe_unsanitized_raw(), "../../../../etc/shadow");

let name = FileName::new("../../.ssh/id_rsa");
assert_eq!(name.dangerous_unsafe_unsanitized_raw(), "../../.ssh/id_rsa");

let name = FileName::new("/Rocket.toml");
assert_eq!(name.dangerous_unsafe_unsanitized_raw(), "/Rocket.toml");

Trait Implementations

Formats the value using the given formatter. Read more

Converts to this type from the input type.

Auto Trait Implementations

Blanket Implementations

Gets the TypeId of self. Read more

Immutably borrows from an owned value. Read more

Mutably borrows from an owned value. Read more